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Crosstown Rebels ground breaking Get Lost series reaches half a decade with Damian Lazarus’ favourite DJ and one of Berlin’s most recognised figures, Acid Pauli. Pauli may not be a household name but he is coveted by those in the know as an enigmatic genius and pioneering figure who understands how to touch and play with the feelings held within music. Victorious in his efforts, Pauli bears a contender for mix of the year or even decade. Rummaging deep, he indulges in his archetypal strange and rare musical pleasures and packages it in a captivating two hour excursion into his reality.
For Get Lost 5 he writes daring new scripts and moulds new boundaries altogether. Beginning with the twisted mechanics of his own production as Console providing the intro to another Berlin secret and Acid Pauli collaborator, NU whose brooding humming works contribute two tracks to the journey. Throughout Pauli continues to wrestle with promiscuous drum patterns amidst sweet harmonic instruments in his quest (note the haunting violin solos of Kadebostan’s ‘Love in Looxer’). He consistently maintains clandestine tones and preserves the earthy shadows of electronica with contemporary underground dance heroes Move D, dOP, SIS and Stimming making appearances alongside more idiosyncratic choices such as Jan Turkenburg’s ‘In My Spaceship’.
Lazarus is such a fan he marked his 40th birthday celebrations at a private party with an epic all night set from Acid Pauli and it’s easy to see why. They share much musical territory and explore the murky waters of their minds in psychedelic patterns and furtive codes. They also cosset a deep love for popular music channelled through unusual interpretations. Pauli includes many eccentricities such as the as yet unheard The Band That Never Met’s rendition of the Bruce Springsteen classic, Gonzalez cover from Pauli & Laura Weider titled ‘Oregano’ and Calico Horse’s take on Radiohead’s ‘Idioteque’. A dextrous wizard akin to the unbounded talents of Matthew Herbert and Aphex Twin, his choices become playful souvenirs that testify to his power to astound.
As the first episode draws to a close it continues to warp and mystify with a bubbling collage of echoing voices and organ synths from Nicolas Jaar with an unreleased production named ‘Play The Drums For Me’. The final moments come from Acid Pauli’s own ‘Farewell Fred’ and are reminiscent of Kraftwerk. Its mischievous conclusion features a traffic light sample insistently calling “Wait”.
Get Lost’s second act can only be heard with a unique download code given to those that purchase the CD, unlocking the lost middle section of this continuous four hour opus.
It’s third act and grand finale takes a more dancefloor course with Pauli’s own ‘Music Is Silence’ opening the curtain. Yet it is still peppered with charms and dim hallucinations such as the textured worlds of Autechre and the spectacular anthemic Monkey Maffia ‘I Know You N.m.s’ that characterise Pauli’s unconventional nature.
Born in the 70s in Bavaria, Germany, Martin Gretschmann AKA Acid Pauli began his adventures in music playing bass guitar in a punk/indie band and as the electronic outfit Console in the mid 90s. After releasing several records (and a track on a Björk album), remixes, even radioplays (together with Andreas Ammer) and touring excessively, Martin concentrated returned back to his solo project, Acid Pauli, which has reached new heights in recent years. A resident DJ at Berlin’s infamous Kater Holzig (the reincarnation of Bar25) and Munich’s Rote Sonne, his style is unrivalled, incorporating not only techno and house but a kaleidoscope of musical varieties that only a genuine master could conquer. For the first time he captures his visions for ‘Get Lost’ and the results are a beguiling pilgrimage into a musical maestro about to take his place in the limelight.

This post originally appeared on Electronic Nightlife, now a part of beatcue.

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